My Library

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Adler-Ten Philosophical MistakesTen Philosophical Mistakes by Mortimer J. Adler (1997)

In this delightfully lucid and accessible book, Mortimer J. Adler, America’s foremost philosopher, explores the ten errors in the development of modern thought, and examines the serious consequences they have in our everyday lives. From the mistake of identifying happiness with having a good time to the argument over free will and free choice, Adler explains how these errors came about and what we can do to avoid them. “In Ten Philosophical Mistakes, Adler takes on Locke, Hume, Rousseau, Hobbes, Marx, and a passel of other post-16th-century thinkers, whose common and ‘disastrous’ mistake was to invent new kinds of wisdom without building on the ancient truths.” –Time


Allen and Springstead-Philosophy for Understanding Theology

Philosophy for Understanding Theology by Diogenes Allen and Eric O. Springsted (2007)

Philosophy for Understanding Theology has become the classic text for exploring the relationship between philosophy and Christian theology. This new edition adds chapters on postmodernism and questions of the self and the good to bring the book up to date with current scholarship. It introduces students to the influence that key philosophers and philosophical movements through the centuries have had on shaping Christian theology in both its understandings and forms of expression.


Augustine-On Christian Doctrine

Saint Augustine On Christian Doctrine by D.W. Robertson, Jr. (1958)

This translation of St. Augustine’s De doctrina Christiana is based on the Benedictine text. Quotations from the Bible appear in the Douay-Rheims version, but the footnotes contain references in brackets to indicate the location of corresponding verses in the King James Bible where that Bible contains the same material arranged according to a different system. These quotations have not been altered so as to conform exactly to St. Augustine’s text except in those instances where such alterations were necessary for clarity. In the process of this work I have consulted, from time to time, the earlier English versions of Shaw and Gavigan, and I gratefully acknowledge that I derived considerable assistance in clearing up a number of difficult or ambiguous passages.


Burge-The New Testament in AntiquityThe New Testament in Antiquity by Gary Burge (2009)

The New Testament in Antiquity is a textbook for college and seminary students penned by three evangelical scholars with over fifty years of combined experience in the classroom. Their challenge was to build a text that would be engaging, academically robust, richly illustrated, and relevant to the modern student. This book strikes a balance between being accessible to all students and challenging them to explore the depths of the New Testament within its cultural worlds. The New Testament in Antiquity carefully develops how Jewish and Hellenistic cultures formed the essential environment in which the New Testament authors wrote their books and letters. It argues that knowing the land, history, and culture of this world brings remarkable new insights into how we read the New Testament itself. Numerous sidebars provide windows into the Jewish, Hellenistic, and Roman worlds and integrate this material directly with the interpretation of the literature of the New Testament. This is an ideal introductory text for classroom use, with ample discussion questions and bibliographies.


Evans-Fabricating Jesus

Fabricating Jesus by Craig A. Evans (2008)

Modern historical study of the Gospels seems to give us a new portrait of Jesus every spring–just in time for Easter. The more unusual the portrait, the more it departs from the traditional view of Jesus, the more attention it gets in the popular media. Why are scholars so prone to fabricate a new Jesus? Why is the public so eager to accept such claims without question? What methods and assumptions predispose scholars to distort the record? Is there a more sober approach to finding the real Jesus? Commenting on such recent releases as Bart Ehrman’s Misquoting Jesus, James Tabor’s The Jesus Dynasty, Michael Baigent’s The Jesus Papers and the Gospel of Judas, for which he served as an advisory board member to the National Geographic Society, Craig Evans offers a sane approach to examining the sources for understanding the historical Jesus.


Hasker-MetaphysicsMetaphysics by William Hasker 1983

What is ultimately real? What is God like? Do human beings have minds and souls or only brains in bodies? Are humans free agents or are all human acts determined by prior circumstances? Through insightful analysis and careful evaluation, William Hasker helps readers answer these questions and thereby construct a world view to make sense of the universe and the people in it.

 


Hodge-Systematic Theology

Systematic Theology (3-Volume Set) by Charles Hodge (1999)

The magnum opus of one of America’s most prominent theologians offers an in-depth exploration of theology, anthropology, soteriology, and eschatology. This monumental work, now a standard for theological students, was written while Hodge served as a professor at Princeton, where he permanently influenced American Christianity as a teacher, preacher, and exegete. Includes a comprehensive index.


Kinlaw-Lets Start With Jesus

Let’s Start With Jesus by Dennis F. Kinlaw (2005)

“If you really knew me, you would know my Father as well. From now on, you do know him and have seen him.” (John 14:7) Jesus is the great stumbling block of faith. It is in him that Christianity finds its uniqueness among the religions of the world. He is the Incarnate Son of God, the unique revelation of the Father. Yet so often, we begin the process of theological formulation not with the person of Jesus, but rather, with philosophical arguments about God’s existence and logical constructions to determine God’s nature. How would our understanding be affected if we instead took Jesus as our starting point for doing theology? In Let’s Start with Jesus, respected biblical scholar Dennis Kinlaw explores this question, revealing answers that are profound. In seeking to describe the nature of the relationship God desires with us, he explores three metaphors—royal/legal, familial, and nuptial—which serve as motifs for his reflection. Taking familiar theological categories, Kinlaw views them through the primary lens of the person and work of Jesus, and finds that Jesus reveals rich pictures of the nature of God, the nature of personhood, the problem of sin, the way of salvation, and finally, the means of sanctification via perfect love. The distilled wisdom of one of this generation’s greatest thinkers.


McCartney-Let The Reader Understand

Let The Reader Understand by Dan McCartney (2002)

For many people, interpreting the Bible is the art of making it say what they want. Even scholars often treat interpretation as subjective exercise, not the search for true, objective meaning of texts. But hasn’t God spoken definitively in Scripture? Shouldn’t we be able to arrive at a good and true interpretation?

Convinced that God wants us to understand his Word in all its literary genres, Dan McCartney and Charles Clayton have provided a thorough, readable introduction to biblical interpretation, now updated in this second edition to address post-modern approaches.


The Christian Theology Reader by Alister E. McGrath (2011)McGrath-The Christian Theology Reader

This bestselling volume is now available in a fully updated and expanded fourth edition, bringing together 378 readings, drawn from over 230 sources, and charting 2,000 years of Christian history.

  • Each reading is accompanied by its own introduction, commentary and study questions, and illustrates a key doctrine, point of view, intellectual development, or theological landmark
  • Includes several new readings on religion and science, an expanded coverage of feminist theological voices, extracts from radical Protestant perspectives, and more contemporary theology

Classic Christianity by Thomas C. Oden (2009)Oden-Classic Christianity

For the first time, Thomas Oden’s Systematic Theology classic series (individually titled The Living God, The Word of Life, and Life in the Spirit) is available in one complete volume. A renowned theologian, Oden provides a consensus view of the Christian faith, delving deeply into ancient Christian tradition and bringing to the contemporary church the best wisdom from its past. In this magisterial work, Oden tackles the central questions of Christian belief and the nature of the trinity.


Pinnock-Flame of LoveFlame of Love by Clark H. Pinnock (1999)

A 1997 Christianity Today Book of the Year In what may be regarded as his magnum opus, Clark Pinnock here turns attention to the vital Christian doctrine of the Holy Spirit. Writing out of wide learning and deep personal passion, he shows us the way to restore the oft-neglected Spirit to centrality in the life and witness of the church. Pinnock explores the doctrine of the Spirit in relation to other key doctrines such as the Trinity, creation, Christology and the church. Never one to duck the difficult or sensitive questions, he also examines issues of the Spirit’s universality, gender language for the Spirit, and charismatic gifts. Pinnock intends his book to be catholic (in the sense of respecting the beliefs and worship of the historic church) and evangelical (drawing particularly on the heritage of the Reformation). Always in sight is the mission of the church, for “people want to meet the real and living God and will not be satisfied with a religion that only preaches and moralizes.” He concludes, “Only by attending to the Spirit can we move beyond sterile rationalist religion in the direction of recovering the sense of intimacy and immediacy for which our generation–and every generation–longs.


Whitney-Spiritual Disciplines for the Christian Life

Spiritual Disciplines for the Christian Life by Donald S. Whitney (1997)

Drawn from a rich heritage, Spiritual Disciplines for the Christian Life will guide you through a carefully selected array of disciplines, including:

  • Scripture reading
  • Prayer
  • Worship
  • Scripture meditation
  • Evangelism
  • Serving
  • Stewardship of time and money
  • Scripture application
  • Fasting
  • Silence and solitude
  • Journaling
  • Learning

By illustrating why the disciplines are important, showing how each one will help you grow in godliness, and offering practical suggestions for cultivating them, Spiritual Disciplines for the Christian Life will provide you with a refreshing opportunity to become more like Christ and grow in character and maturity.


Wright-Old Testament Ethics for the People of God

Old Testament Ethics for the People of God by Christopher J. H. Wright (2011)

Nothing confuses Christian ethics quite like the Old Testament. Some faithful readers struggle through its pages and conclude that they must obey its moral laws but may disregard its ceremonial and civil laws. Others abandon its teaching altogether in favor of a strictly New Testament ethic. Neither option, argues Chris Wright, gives the Old Testament its due. In this innovative approach to Old Testament ethics–fully revised, updated and expanded since its first appearance in 1983 as Living as the People of God (An Eye for an Eye in North America) and including material from Walking in the Ways of the Lord–Wright examines a theological, social and economic framework for Old Testament ethics. Then he explores a variety of themes in relation to contemporary issues: economics, the land and the poor; politics and a world of nations; law and justice; society and culture; and the way of the individual. This fresh, illuminating study provides a clear basis for a biblical ethic that is faithful to the God of both Testaments.